Continuing Along the Path with a Novice High Mini-Unit and IPA on Leisure Activities

For the past few years, my life has been all about following paths.  For three weeks each summer I hike on the Chemin de St. Jacques de Compostelle/Camino de Santiago and during the rest of the year I plan how to lead my students on their own path to proficiency. Just as I find myself returning to Europe to discover new routes to the same destination, I continue to rework my lessons to more closely align with my current understandings of best practices.

This year I will once again start my French 2 classes with a unit on leisure activities.  This topic is well-suited to their proficiency level and the nature of the unit helps us all get to know each other. Rather than a lengthily, all-encompassing unit this year, however, I’ve created a short mini-unit. Last year’s more thorough unit presented a few unanticipated problems.  Due to the length of the unit, my students did not take a summative assessment/IPA for several weeks.  As a result, I did not have formal data on their level of proficiency for my own records or to share with them, until the end of our first 6-week grading period.  Because one of my goals for this year is to provide more targeted, proficiency-based feedback, I want to create earlier opportunities for this type of conversations with my students, especially those who may not have been exposed to the idea of proficiency during their first year of language study. When my colleague suggested we create a short mini-unit to introduce the topic of leisure activities (which will be followed with a longer unit that includes daily activities, weather and seasons), I thought it was a brilliant idea.  This 2-3-week unit will give us an opportunity to introduce our students to proficiency-based Can-Do statements, lessons designed around the three modes of communication and exposure to authentic resources.  Furthermore, the IPA will give us data on the proficiency level at which the students are able to perform.  Armed with this knowledge, we will be able to begin the process of providing the types of feedback that will help these students to progress throughout the year. Best of all, our conversations about how we spend our free time will help to create the types of relationships that will facilitate the warm and positive classroom environment that is so important to language learning.

Day 1: As this agenda shows, we’ll introduce the topic of leisure activities with a teacher-led discussion of a basic infographic on Sunday activities.This discussion will allow us to provide comprehensible input using some of the targeted structures. The students will then engage in a short pre-viewing conversation before listening (as a class) to a video in which a girl describes some of her leisure activities.  A teacher-led discussion during the viewing will help provide additional comprehensible input. Lastly, the students will begin reading a detailed infographic on leisure activities and completing an IPA-style comprehension guide.  (This interpretive activity will continue the following day.)

Day 2: The lesson will begin with a video and teacher-led discussion of the video as well as personalized questions.The students will then complete a heavily-scaffolded interpersonal activity in which they ask and answer questions about a partner’s leisure activities, and then fill in a graphic organizer comparing their pastimes. The rest of the class period will be used for finishing the infographic from the previous day.

Day 3: After another short teacher-directed discussion based on an infographic (with personalized questioning), the students will interview a new partner about the frequency with which s/he participates in various activities. The students will then participate in a matching “game” in which they take turns describing pictures in order to match each picture on their paper to the corresponding picture on their partner’s paper.  I often use this type of activity with my novice learners and have found it effective in engaging these students and encouraging their spontaneous speech. Time permitting, I may conduct a formative assessment in which I describe a few of the pictures and the students jot down the number/letter of the corresponding picture.  

Day 4: I will begin this lesson with another infographic-based discussion, which will be followed by an interpretive activity for an infographic on teens and sports.  In this case, I’ve created French comprehension questions in order to encourage target language use as the students work on the task.

Day 5: I will start this lesson by going over the correct answers on the previous day’s interpretive activity. This discussion will provide additional input that will prepare the students for the interpersonal and presentational activities that follow. Finally, the students will complete a series of Edpuzzle formative listening assessments for cartoon videos in which Trotro the donkey does various sports-related activities.

Day 6: This lesson, on the topic of music, will again begin with a teacher-led discussion of an infographic as well as personalized questions about music.  The students will then complete an interpretive activity about a music-themed infographic and a related conversation.

Day 7: This lesson will begin with a cloze activity for the current top-20 song Je joue de la musique. The students will then complete a presentational writing assignment designed to encourage them to synthesize what they learned about the listening habits of French teens and compare these practices to their own.  Finally, they will complete an Edpuzzle for a  music-based Trotro video.

Day 8: This class period will be spent preparing for the IPA. The students will both practice the conversation prompt and prepare a draft of the writing prompt.  I will divide the class into two separate groups, enabling me to provide feedback to those students who are speaking.  I will collect the written drafts at the end of the period and provide feedback using this document from my previous post.

Day 9: If all goes as planned, the students will take their IPA during this 90-minute block. (Otherwise, I will give it over the next two days.)  I will distribute the article and IPA packet to the class, and will call up pairs of students for the interpersonal task while the rest of the class is working on the reading.  As students finish the reading, they will begin the final draft of the writing, on which they will have access to their first draft as well as my feedback.  

Note: You should find each of the resources and materials linked to the agenda.  However, if anything is missing or not shared correctly, please let me know.  I encourage you to make a copy for your own use so that you can correct any errors you may find and make modifications based on your own students’ needs.  As an additional resource for my students, I prepared this document which includes the learning goals for the unit and some vocabulary and structures that the students can use on the learning activities throughout the unit (but not on their IPA).

Have a great rest of the summer!

16 thoughts on “Continuing Along the Path with a Novice High Mini-Unit and IPA on Leisure Activities

  1. Kathryn Zetts

    Merci mille fois, Lisa–I love the Resource Guide!

    How interesting that you hike the Camino…I have thought about doing that myself. do you hike in France, Spain, or both?

    You said that this is a mini-unit of 2-3 weeks. How long is the other (non-mini) unit? will you do the longer one immediately following?

    Merci beaucoup

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      You have to do the Camino! My husband and I have made 4 trips in total–we only walk about 200 miles per trip because my husband can only take 3 weeks of vacation. We did the most popular Spanish route (The Camino Frances) in 2013 and 2014. Then we started the Le Puy route in France in 2015. We took 2016 off for our move, but continued on the Le Puy route this year. There’s a local Camino group in Columbus (which we founded, but turned over to another member when we moved). They have monthly meetings that you could attend if you want to talk to others that have done it. I know you’d love it as much as we do! As for the unit question, I ended up posting the next unit, too. It’s this one: http://madameshepard.com/?p=1340

      Reply
  2. Lenore Whitehurst

    I am so excited to begin my journey into a proficiency based classroom with your fabulous ideas and resources! I do have one question about the IPA. The objectives mention a video, but I don’t see either a video nor an interpretive listening assessment. Was that something you omitted when you shortened the unit?
    Merci!

    Reply
  3. Kayleen Shoffner

    Bonjour Madame,

    Would you be able to give me some insight on how you selected a Pre and Post Test for French Level One and Two and then again substantiate the standards for each one?

    You have been highly recommended by all the French teachers I have met taking courses. I have to get started reading all of your sites and information. I am in a crunch time frame, for the state tests to be sent to the administration. Although I have had mine ok’d in the past, I wanted to see how you did yours, if you do not mind. Thank you!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, I’m not sure I understand your question. Could you tell me which pre-/post- tests you’re referring to?

      Reply
  4. Lenore Whitehurst

    Hi. One more question regarding feedback. On the practice presentational writing topics of sports and music (done prior to IPA prep day) do you give formal feedback using the same form that you do on prep day?
    Thank you!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      This is a great question. While I would love to say that I do, I’m afraid there just aren’t enough hours in the day! If I remember correctly, I ended up not even assigning one of those writings and I think I provided only very cursory feedback on the other.

      Reply
  5. Kathryn Zetts

    Do the students get a packet for this unit, or just do everything on their computers? did I miss something? We’re slowly moving towards “1:1” but my juniors and seniors don’t have school-issued chromebooks, so I am still quite reliant on paper. I can probably make this work but thought maybe I missed a link to a packet…

    Merci!

    Reply
    1. Kathryn Zetts

      Merci, Lenore! I did print that out (I didn’t notice it until after I submitted my comment). It seems to be goals, vocab, and grammar; I have no doubt it will be very valuable, in fact I used it today in class.

      In other units there have been pages with comprehension questions about various authentic resources, often with a copy of the link to wherever those resources are found online (or a link to a scanned copy of an authentic resource that is not found online). It’s this latter type of thing that I’m wondering about–whether there is a packet or whether I’ll need to create one.

      …and if I’ll need to create one, from the links on the daily agenda items, I’m wondering whether it’s better to collect them all together and make a single packet, or to print them out one or two at a time as we get to them. Any thoughts, Lisa or other readers?

      Thanks!

      Reply
      1. madameshepard Post author

        Yes, I’ve made a change from creating the larger packets. I think there are advantages of having the packets–everything is all together so there are fewer papers to keep track of, it’s easier for absent students to see what they’ve missed, etc. On the other hand, I’ve received feedback from colleagues that some students have shared that they felt overwhelmed when presented with large packets. (I also enjoy having the ability to easily make changes throughout the unit when I copy only a few activities at a time.) I certainly invite all of you to copy the materials as you see fit!

        Reply
  6. Lenore Whitehurst

    Whew! That makes me feel much better! Thanks for the reply. We finished the IPA yesterday. I asked the students how they were feeling about our new class methods. One girl said ” I’m learning so much and I’m so proud of myself!”

    Reply

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