Le Petit Prince: A communicative approach

petitprince

Le Petit Prince: A Communicative Approach

Although my teaching has evolved considerably over the past 25 years, one constant has been Le Petit Prince.  This novel has been part of my French 4 curriculum nearly every year and I love it more every time I teach it! Fortunately, my family understands my passion for this character, and I now have a wonderful collection of Little Prince memorabilia including jewelry, a lunchbox, and even a pair of hand-painted shoes.  Most of my students grow to love this novel as much as I do and often buy their own copies after they graduate. I was especially touched to receive an e-mail last spring from a former student who wrote to me to share an article he had read about the novel in The New Yorker.  Although I hadn’t realized it when he was in my class, this novel had meant a lot to this student and he was excited about coming across the article years after reading the novel in my class.

Last year, because my French 4 students were placed in the same class as my French 5 students (who had read the novel the previous year), I had to take a short break from my beloved novel.  For this reason, I’m especially excited to teach it this year!  Although I won’t start until January, I’ve spent the last two weekends revamping my materials in order to make sure that my approach reflects my current understanding of best practices.  I’ve included a link to the workbook I created at the end of this post.  Here’s a description of how I’ll teach each chapter. (The information in parentheses refers to the corresponding workbook section.)

#1: Advance Organizer (Part A)

For each chapter I’ve included a question or two related to the theme of the chapter.  The students will discuss these questions in order to prepare for the reading.

#2: Vocabulary (Parts B/C)

I’ll start each chapter by presenting a few key words from the chapter.  I’ve provided pictures for the concrete nouns (and some verbs) and French definitions for the others.  I’ll project the pictures on the screen and ask the questions which incorporate the new vocabulary so that they are familiar with the words before we begin reading the chapter.

#2: Introduction to the text (Part D)

I’ll begin by playing the animated audio version of the text I found on Youtube.  Here’s a link to the Chapter 1 video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvRIccSAHEwk . After they’ve listened, they’ll read the text and answer the comprehension level true/false questions for the chapter. The students will work in groups to read and answer these questions, and we will then go over them as a class.  I have chosen true/false questions here, because I find that they encourage discussion more than other types of objective questions.  When I go over this section, I always ask students to justify their responses with specific details from the text.  They have to explain why the item is either true or false.

#3: Inference Questions (Part E)

In this section, students read inference-based questions and choose whether they agree or disagree with each statement, providing evidence from the text.  I often have the students respond to these individually, and then discuss with their groups.  The nature of the questions encourages both an in-depth reading of the text and lively discussions, as there is often not a clear cut “right” answer.

#4: Role-Ply (Part F)

Next, the students work with a partner on the role-play based on a hypothetical discussion related to the chapter.  These role plays provide additional opportunities for interpersonal communication, as well as help the students to synthesize the material from the chapter.

#5: Key Quotes (Part G)

Lastly, the students discuss a key quote from the chapter and how it relates to their own personal experience.

While I developed these activities to maximize opportunities for interpersonal communication, they can also be adapted for other modes or for assessment purposes.  Because my grading system is based on language skill categories, I include assessments for each skill through this instructional unit. Therefore, I might occasionally have the students work individually on the true/false questions and submit them for an assessment of their accuracy (interpretive reading), rather than discussing them in class.  I might also prepare comprehension questions for the videos, in order to assess their interpretive listening skills. The “Citation Clé” sections can easily be turned into a writing assessment, rather than/after being discussed orally in class. I record interpersonal speaking grades as I circulate among the students each day, but students could also prepare a response to an inference question, quote, or role-play, for an assessment of their presentational speaking.

Here’s a link to the workbook I’ve developed. Le Petit Prince .  Although I condensed it into 25 pages for the purposes of sharing, I will probably add spaces for student responses so that the copy I give them will be considerably longer.  Also, since I just finished this work I haven’t yet seen it in printed form or used it in class you’ll probably find some typos or other errors—please accept my apologies in advance!  I’ll update the link if I find any glaring errors!

I’d love to hear your feedback on these materials, as well as your ideas for this novel.  Please share by adding a comment using the link above!

59 thoughts on “Le Petit Prince: A communicative approach

  1. Amy Sternke

    I love this novel! I teach it with my level fives every year. This year, I only have three level five students and they are in three separate classes due to scheduling conflicts. I am so sad that I don’t get to read with them – they’ll have to do it mostly on their own – so I’m excited to look through what you have here that will be helpful for them! Thank you so much for sharing this!! 🙂

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Amy. I can imagine how disappointed you must be! I sometimes have the same scheduling issues–I guess it comes along with the territory, when you’re a French teacher. Does your school have a Moodle site or Google App that would at least allow the students to discuss the ideas in the book virtually/in writing?

      Reply
      1. Charlene Davatos

        Bonjour! I am an AP French teacher currently teaching Le Petit Prince for the first time! Would you happen to have an answer key to these worksheets? I love them and think they’d make great review for the quizzes I plan to give.

        Reply
        1. madameshepard Post author

          Hi, I’m sorry but I don’t. I always just went over them orally with the students.

          Reply
  2. Alice Browning

    This is wonderful! I have been following your blog and it has been so helpful as I continue to evolve into a more proficiency-based classroom. How many weeks do you typically spend on LPP?

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Alice! Thanks for your kind comment! I usually spend most of 3rd quarter on the novel. I start with some introductory activities about the author/novel and a lesson on the passe simple. Then we do the activities that I posted here. Afterwards, we watch the musical on youtube, although I’m thinking about showing it in sections through the reading phase this year.

      Reply
  3. Sue McDaniel

    Merci mille fois, Madame Shepherd! C’est genial ce que vous avez mis ensemble. J’enseigne ce petit bouqin depuis quelques annees, et je cherche toujours de nouvelles idees pour interesser les eleves!
    Sue McDaniel

    Reply
      1. Courtney

        D’abord je voudrais vous remercier pour tout le travaille que vous avez fait dont moi et mes élèves profitent. Nous amons vos questions. C’est vraiment excellent.

        Nous avons eu une question que je n’ai pu répondre. Dans les questions du vocabulaire du chapitre 8, le troisième question est “Est-ce que vous continuez à croitre?”

        Pour ce que j’ai compris, les personnes grandissent, les cheveux et les ongles poussent et les plantes ou l’économie croitent.

        Donc j’ai eu mal a comprendre la question. Pouvez-vous m’aider à comprendre.

        Merci.

        Reply
        1. madameshepard Post author

          Merci de ta reponse et je m’excuse de l’erreur de vocabulaire. Je changerai croitre a grandir aussitot que j’aurai un moment libre.

          Reply
  4. Alie Browning

    I know I already posted, but I can’t thank you enough for your wonderful ideas! My group coming up has very weak reading skills – it’s their least favorite part of class. Any suggestions on doing LPP with a weaker group like this? I want so much for them to enjoy and appreciate the message of this book and am worried they will get lost!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Alie, I empathize with you about your less-than-enthusiastic readers! Like you said, the beauty of this book is the ideas, and it’s a shame when the students can’t fully appreciate the novel because they can’t understand the message. I’m not sure how you usually approach the reading. I have them do the actual reading in class, because I found that I could not have productive discussions when I assigned the reading at home. They either didn’t read, or read in English so they did not have the necessary vocabulary to discuss in French. I have them read and answer the true/false questions in small groups, so that the better readers can help out the ones who struggle. I’m hoping that playing the youtube video recordings will help some of the less enthusiastic readers, too. If it’s a lack of vocabulary that’s causing comprehension problems, maybe you would want to do more vocabulary presentation before beginning each chapter? Let me know how it goes!

      Reply
  5. Corine Charrier

    I have been teaching for 20 years and I know that I have to change my lesson plans to aim at more communication/proficiency.
    I agree that it is a lack of vocabulary that prevents students from understanding.
    What about conjugations? How do you incorporate them in your communicative approach? Do you just mention a verb here and there when it appears within context? Or do you still invest time teaching conjugation patterns?
    Because I don’t have enough time, I only teach the beginning chapters and chapter XXI of The Little Prince while covering a unit on FRIENDSHIP/LOVE. I finish this unit by showing the film MON MEILLEUR AMI with Daniel Auteuil and Dany Boon, pointing at the part about the Little Prince at 69 minutes into the movie.
    Thanks for all you share with us! I should also start blogging, it would help me with sorting out and organizing all my teaching ressources.

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Since this is my 25th year, I can empathize with your position! Because this is the first year that I haven’t used a textbook, my philosophy on grammar instruction is still evolving. I will say that I have not taught any direct verb conjugations to my French 1 students. It’s kind of scary, but so far it seems to be going well. My next challenge begins next week when I am going to introduce the passe compose to my French 2 students. I’m not ready to just address examples as they appear, but at the same time I don’t want to do a lot of direct grammar instruction after focusing on communicative tasks for all of first semester. When I work it out, I’ll share what I come up with! I did a little bit of direct grammar instruction with the 3’s–we spent some time reviewing p.c. and imperfect and I also taught them the future tense. Rome wasn’t built it a day and I can’t change EVERYTHING in the course of a single year.
      My students and I love Mon Meilleur Ami! I cry every time the Daniel Auteuil character discovers the journal with the Little Prince passage. This year, I wasn’t able to show the film, because my 4/5’s are combined and the 5’s already saw it, so we watched Intouchables, which they also loved. Let me know if you start blogging, I’d love to follow you. In the meantime, please keep in touch. My reason for starting this blog was to be able to collaborate with other teachers–we French teachers need to stick together. “L’Union fait la force!”

      Reply
  6. Michelle Fournier

    Holy cow! I just discovered your blog through a colleague. There is a ton of amazing stuff on here. I, too, have been transforming my teaching, and it is silly to reinvent the wheel … do you have a place on here for collaboration? I am about to start my Petit Prince unit with my French IV class and I LOVE your resources, which, clearly, you are sharing out of the goodness of your heart.

    Are you in Maine? Can I buy you lunch???

    Please feel free to check out my website. It is a work in progress, but I add links to authentic resources all the time. You can also follow me on Diigo and/or on Pinterest. My user name is fournierm.

    Merci, merci, merci!

    – Michelle

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Michelle, thank you so much for your kind comments. I’m in Ohio, but a trip to Acadia is on my bucket list so I’ll definitely take you up on that lunch offer when I’m there! Your site looks great and I’ll look for you on Pinterest (maybe I’m already following you?). I’m up for any kind of collaboration–let me know what might work for you! Keep in touch! Lisa

      Reply
  7. Michelle Fournier

    Hi Lisa,

    Thanks for your reply. Do let me know when you’re coming to Maine. I live outside of Portland, which is probably where you’d fly in.

    I just started using Pinterest recently, so there’s not much there … most of my links are on Diigo. I have developed a number of activities tied to links on my website, so if you see a link you like (particularly videos), let me know and I can share the activities.

    In terms of collaboration, please let me know if you want to share units. The categories under “thèmes et séquences” on my website correspond to units I have developed or am developing. Obviously I don’t put things like assessments on there, but I am happy to share what I’ve developed if you are doing a similar unit.

    I am also part of a group of Teacher Leaders in Maine. We do a lot of cool stuff! There is also a “Maine World Language Teachers” page on FB that you might want to follow.

    Let’s keep in touch!

    – Michelle

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Thanks so much about the Maine info–I’ll look forward to it! In the meantime, I did try to find your Pinterest, but there are dozens of pinners with your name! I haven’t used Diigo before, but I’ll have to check it out. I’ll do some more surfing on your site, too, thanks for the additional info. I’ll definitely check out the FB page, too. I’m so excited about the opportunity to collaborate!

      Reply
  8. Clarice H.

    Merci mille fois pour vos ressources! Thank you so much – I teach very similar topics in my classes, and it is great to get new ideas and see what other people are doing to incorporate proficiency-based assessment and IPAs into the classroom. I read Le Petit Prince with my class each year as well, and I am so excited to work on improving what I’ve done in previous years. Thank you again – keep up the great blog!!!

    Reply
  9. Brittany

    Thank you so much for posting your wonderful workbook! I am teaching Le Petit Prince for the first time this year and am looking for any resources to help me make this a great experience for the students. Merci mille fois!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      I hope your students enjoy the book as much as mine do! Are you familiar with the musical (on YouTube)? My students enjoy watching it after reading the novel.

      Reply
  10. Carie Z.

    Merci mille fois! I am just finishing my second year of teaching French. Your website is a treasure trove of amazing ideas! My summer plans include revamping my lessons based on suggestions from your website. Merci for taking the time & being willing to share your incredible resources!

    Reply
  11. Laura

    MERCI! I’ve just stumbled upon your website and am so thankful I did! I’m teaching Le Petit Prince for the first time next spring to my French IV’s and am thrilled to have found just a fabulous resource! Merci mille fois!!!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      I’m so glad you’ve found something you can use! Let me know if you have any questions.

      Reply
  12. Rachael

    Really, thank you so much for posting this. I am coming back to teaching after being at home with my children. Haven’t taught Le Petit Prince in well over 10 years and no longer have my files. This is a super great help- thank you!!!!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Thanks, Heather. I continue to love this book, even after 27 years of teaching it and my students share my passion for the novel. Today we were watching a scene in a film (Mon Meilleur Ami) where one character reads another’s journal in which he has written a quote from the book. There wasn’t a dry eye in the class when they realized which quote was written.

      Reply
  13. Molly Crellin

    Merci mille fois! While I have been teaching French for 12 years, this is the first year I have had the opportunity to teach Le Petit Prince. I have a feeling your blog post is going to save my life. My colleague, who has always taught French III until this year, had told me I could use the resources from Spokane Falls. Well, unfortunately, that has been taken down. While looking for other alternatives, we ran across your resources and they are great. I will be looking for you on Pinterest. I am Madame Crellin on Pinterest. I have just recently started using Pinterest professionally and haven’t posted a ton recently as I am overwhelmed at the moment, but am looking forward to using it more frequently. It is an amazing resource.

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      I love Pinterest, too. Like you, I haven’t had a lot of time to spend on it recently, but it’s a great way to curate authentic resources. I’m madameshepard there, too. I had used some of the materials from Spokane Falls in the past, but I think they were just basic comprehension questions. My goal in developing my materials was to encourage class discussion as we read the novel. Let me know how the activities work for your students!

      Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Malheureusement, je n’en ai pas. Pour la plupart, on discute les reponses en classe. Si tu as une question, je serais contente d’y repondre. Lisa

      Reply
  14. Nathalie Letourneau

    Chère Madame Shepard,
    This is my first year teaching LPP and I am so grateful for this guide!
    Du fond du cœur, un grand merci!

    Reply
  15. Jessica Howell

    Bonjour Madame Shepard,

    Thank you so much for sharing your incredibly thoughtful, thorough proficiency based lessons. We are in the process of transitioning our curriculum and your approach has been very helpful in our understanding.

    I have a question for you- how do you approach teaching a book such as Le Petit Prince within the framework of the proficiency based curriculum? Specifically, do you think that we would need to make a thematic unit about relationships/love/loss or childhood and fit the book into it to warrant its place in the curriculum under the umbrella of thematic units?

    I personally believe that the book is undeniably worth teaching for its own merit, for myriad reasons but we have been framing everything in terms of creating an IPA and essential questions, and performance assessments and feedback loop and progress monitoring etc- so do you just take a break from that cycle when you teach this book? I see that you have ” a communicative approach” and you are doing a lot of the performance based activities within the teaching of the book with the interpersonal role play etc- but I am assuming that you do not have a formal IPA/thematic unit? I guess my problem is, we tried to create a thematic unit and an IPA around this book because we wanted to keep it in the curriculum, and we thought we had to make an official thematic unit in order to keep it, but it just feels forced.

    We ended up having the essential question be “how do individuals and societies define quality of life?” (I think we lifted that from Jefferson County but didn’t do the environmental part of it) and the AP theme was Personal and Public Identities. The IPA had interpretive activities of listening to a French song about love/loss and reading an article in a French magazine about relationships and answering questions. The presentational activities were writing- 1. Who is the most influential person in your life? Describe your relationship and how this person has affected you as a person? and 2. Choose a quote from Le Petit Prince, analyze its meaning and relate it to your own life. and Presentational speaking: Talk about what makes you happy. How do you make other people happy? Do you believe exploration can overcome narrow mindedness? Or we were going to turn the presentational speaking into a paired interpersonal along the same lines. But again, this IPA was just kind of forced and the different parts didn’t really relate to each other and it was overall fairly weak.

    SO my question is- Do you think we have to make an IPA/thematic unit to teach Le Petit Prince? Because, after consulting the “Keys” book from ACTFL, I got the sense that an IPA as the end of a thematic unit was intended to reflect what individuals do in the real world on their own, and was assessed after multiple formative shots at the same tasks with feedback, and modeling of strong and weak work etc. I just want to teach Le Petit Prince because it is an important piece of literature that is historically significant in French culture. And I love it. And I think it has a ton of reflective themes and self searching questions that teenagers can really relate to in multiple modes. And the students will be performing in all of the modes throughout the study of the book, so can a book be the unit? Do you think that is enough of a reason to teach it as a “communicative approach” and not having to invent an IPA and a thematic unit. How does teaching a book fit into the new proficiency based world?

    Thanks in advance for any insight.
    Jessica

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Jessica
      Thank you so much for asking such important and thought-provoking questions. Please accept my apologies for taking so long to respond–your questions definitely deserved more than a brief responses typed on my phone! Fortunately, I have had a lot of freedom when designing my curriculum, so I haven’t had to make this book fit into any type of curricular framework. However, I think that many of the AP themes are addressed in the novel and the essential questions that you wrote are awesome. I can understand the challenges that you faced, though, in integrating the many different themes into one IPA. I haven’t yet read the Keys book but I’m looking forward to doing so this summer. As for your question, yes I think the book is a unit and that’s how I approached it. In fact, you’ve eloquently stated all of my own feelings about the novel in your last paragraph. This book has been so meaningful to my students over the years and with the movie coming out I’m hearing from students that have long since graduated about how excited they are to see it. On a more practical note, I do feel that I need to assess the students in each mode throughout the novel, which takes me several weeks to cover. As a result I’ve created a series of performance-based assessments that I use when teaching the novel. I’ll try to share them in a future post, but each one includes an authentic video related to the novel, an authentic text, a role play and an essay based on the key quotes of the section. This satisfies my need to have grades, but keeps our work focused on the novel itself. It seems to me that it’s important to keep in mind that the point of focusing on proficiency is so that our students can listen to, read about, write about and discuss topics of interest to them. Fortunately for those of us who love the Petit Prince, the novel provides us with an authentic, relevant means for using these skills!

      Reply
      1. Jessica Howell

        Thank you so much for all of your hard work and generosity. I thought your assessments really made a lot of sense in terms of trying to fit the book into the proficiency framework. Thanks for clarifying and explaining all of this to those of us who are new at proficiency based design and practice. So happy to be able to keep this book in the curriculum- we celebrated the 70 year anniversary today in class!
        Merci,
        Jessica Howell

        Reply
  16. Heather Pineault

    First, Lisa,
    Thank you again (now that I’m done) for this document. I hadn’t taught the book in 20 years and this was an amazing resource.

    Regarding Jessica’s IPA question, I think we can teach Petit Prince under the EQ that you mentioned, or a theme about love, friendship, how do we define friendship? The role of others in our lives? Then for an IPA, the kids could chose a few quotes from Le Petit Prince, then with a partner compare quotes and decide which ones they think better supports the theme of the unit, and then present their quotes to the class. Or they could read a poem about love and have to discuss, compare to the chapter about the rose, and then present to the class.

    Another possibility would be what I just did (but I hadn’t organized it in the form of an IPA), if the theme was broader about “Issues facing society today” or something along those lines, I had the students create their own planets — what issues would Saint-Exupéry include as new planets were he to write the book today. The students really got in to this. They had to re-read the planet chapters, talk with a partner about different ideas and choose one to present to the class (some wrote and illustrated a short chapter, others made posters, others powerpoints – I left the presentational piece totally up to them).

    Three other thoughts – In order to keep the book moving along (it is long), I jigsawed the planets with each group presenting one of the planets and sharing a “headline” for the chapter, the problem, the characters, the reaction of the PP, key vocab and then a couple of key quotes.

    I showed the French film that came out last year and it was great (I purchased it on amazon.fr because we have a DVD player that is set for Zone 2). It has a really neat story within a story. The kids loved it and were excited to “see” the story they had read come to life and then talk about similarities and differences. Here is the link to the film’s website which has some great resources, too. http://www.lepetitprince-lefilm.com/

    And finally, I just happened upon this website for a theme park – http://www.parcdupetitprince.com/ and am having my students surf the website and plan an itinerary for visiting.

    To my surprise, my juniors loved the book. Thank you Lisa!!
    Heather

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Heather. Thanks so much for your nice comments and thoughtful response to Jessica’s excellent questions. I’ve been preparing for our regional conference and haven’t had much time to spend on the blog so I’m especially grateful for the collaboration that is taking place in my absence! I love the ideas that you’ve shared here and can’t wait to see the movie myself. Unfortunately it comes out the day I’m leaving for France with 18 students, so I’ll be the last person in town to get to see it! As for IPA’s, I do have a series of IPA’s that I gave throughout the text, but just haven’t had time to share them. I’ll keep this topic in mind for a future post! Thank you again for your wonderful ideas! Lisa

      Reply
  17. STACY attafi

    Thanks again, Lisa, for all your amazing work and your willingness to share! You are an inspiration to so many of us. I have given up teaching le PP in the past few years since my move to a more proficiency-based curriculum because I didn’t think I could teach it that way. Also, my combined 4-5 classes made it difficult since some had already had the novel. Now it’s been 3 years and today they begged me for it! Apparently some have been looking forward to reading it.
    So….I pulled up your post. After seeing your ideas, I am considering it now. My unit was missing listening comprehension and interpersonal activities. It also took me @ 10 weeks! I think I was too focused on them understanding every detail. I also inserted lots a grammar themes and extra reinforcement.
    If I do this, I will have to creat some PBAs and IPAs to give them grades. Is that what you do as well? Have they been successful? Also, about how much time do you spend on it?
    Thanks in advance. I am considering it now for this semester. I love it so and really miss PP! Also the movie coming out would be a nice compliment to the unit! 😉

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Stacy
      Sorry it has taken me so long to respond. I was at a conference and then home for four days before leaving on a 9-day trip to France with students. Since my 4/5 class is also combined, I only teach it every other year. This works to my advantage since those that have read it talk it up to the others. I can’t help you with shortening the text, since I also spend about 10 weeks on it. I don’t do much explicit grammar with it, but I do have the students do most of the reading in class. A colleague and I did create a series of IPA’s for the novel, but I think they need some tweaking. I’ll try to include them in a future post! I hope you get a chance to teach the novel soon! Lisa

      Reply
  18. Ashley L.

    Thank you so much for making this available! I have taught LPP off and on over the past 15 years at the French 3 level, but I was not satisfied with how rote it became the past couple of years. I’m going to shake things up a little by using your model instead! One thing that I will keep from my old approach is giving a short 3 question vrai/faux quiz each day over the previous day’s chapter. It helps keep my students accountable for both the content and the vocab as they go along. I will also probably give bigger quizzes every 7 chapters or so, where I quiz them on vocab and content, mostly using questions that they’ve already seen on the daily quizzes and/or the packet. This is partly to keep them retaining the material, and partly to fulfill grading requirements for my gradebook.
    How much time do you have in each class period? Do you have time to do all the activities in one class period each day? Our classes have been shortened to 45 minutes this year, and we meet about 4 times a week (if there are no interruptions), so I think I’m going to have the students do parts A-C for homework the night before each chapter, then discuss the answers in class before listening to the audio and working together on the V/F questions.
    I also think that, at least at the beginning, I’m going to have my students read along as they listen to the audio of each chapter. Then, maybe as they get into the story more and have had more of a chance to tune their ears up, I’ll try having them listen without the support of the text.
    I am starting this unit today and I’m more excited about it than I have been in the past couple of years–merci mille fois for the rejuvenation of this great story! (I, too, have had former students contact me when they encounter le petit prince, and they’re so excited about the new movie!)

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Ashley I think giving the quizzes is a great way to make the kids accountable. A colleague and I created a series of IPA’s, too, that I hope to be able to share soon. I have 48-minute class periods, and no, I didn’t have time to do everything in class. I think having the students do A-C before class is a great way to prepare them for the reading. I had the students read as they listened, too. It’s kind of tricky, because I like them to see the animation, but the recording would be too difficult for them to fully understand without the support of the text. I hope your students enjoy the novel–I’m sure your enthusiasm will be contagious!

      Reply
  19. Julia Price

    I think I sent a comment already, but don’t see it here. First, thank you for your generosity and your amazing insight and your impressive productivity – it is such a relief to have your resources and see that there are many of us who are able to put them to good use.

    A couple of questions: I’d love to know what biography you use to present St Expery to the students.

    Also, with your Impressionist Unit, I would so enjoy seeing your powerpoints but can’t access them using the google links you provided. Is there any way to get them? Thanks so much!

    Reply
  20. Lindsay Butler

    Thank you SO much for being so generous with all your hard work. I cannot thank you enough. I have been teaching 11 years and while many parts of my personality are very well suited to teaching, I think I will always struggle with generating ideas and lesson plans and assessments in isolation, which is all too common in the teaching profession. I discovered your website this fall and reading your ideas for Entre les Murs was a life saver as I am at a new school this year and I actually feel like a new teacher many days because the transition has been a bit more challenging than I anticipated. I used some of your Entre les Murs materials exactly as you made them, but often it’s just that I need a spring board to jumpstart my own ideas. I am now looking at your Petit Prince work and I am just so appreciative.

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Thank you so much for your kind comments. Having changed schools this year I can empathize regarding challenging transitions. It’s my pleasure to share my materials, errors and all, because this blog has enabled me to “meet” so many wonderful colleagues. Like you said, we are so often isolated and social media is often the only way to connect with others in the profession. Lisa

      Reply
  21. Jackie T.

    Thanks for this! I’m about to teach this with my 3’s …and so I’m gathering materials for the first time!

    Do you have a teacher’s guide or answers to your Vrai ou Faux questions within your packet?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, I’m sorry but I don’t have a key. I usually just discuss the answers to these questions orally with the students. I’m sorry I can’t help!

      Reply
  22. Muriel Damers

    After your unit on the impressionists, which is going VERY WELL, I plan on following your lead again for the Petit prince… I am excited! It is my first year teaching BUT because of all your wonderful lessons, I do not think that the students can tell 😉
    I have a question, do you use rubrics when you grade them “informally” on the interpersonal speaking skills, going from group to group?
    Encore merci pour tout!

    Reply
      1. Jessica Beardmore

        I’ve been following your blog for a while but haven’t managed to read everything yet. I was thrilled to just discover this! I’ve been trying to find a rubric I can work with for interpersonal formative assessment.
        We are still on a A-F grading scale..are you using this as as 10 = 100 grading scale?
        Also, do you use the same rubric in all levels of French? Any elaboration on how to assess informally like this would be wonderful.
        What do the symbols PS – IC, etc mean?
        Thank you so much!
        Jessica

        Reply
        1. madameshepard Post author

          Hi, Jessica
          I’m having a little trouble understanding the context of your questions, because your comment is linked to the Petit Prince post, which I don’t think (?) has any rubrics. I continue to evolve in my understanding of assessment that I’m not exactly which post/rubric you’re referring to, but I’ll do my best to answer your questions, and will happily follow up if I’m missing the mark. I grade most things on a scale of 1-10 (but don’t generally give any score lower than 5). I’m now using rubrics that I’ve adapted from those found http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Learning-in-Ohio/Foreign-Language/World-Languages-Model-Curriculum/World-Languages-Model-Curriculum-Framework/Instructional-Strategies/Scoring-Guidelines-for-World-Languages (I use the proficiency-based ones.) This is the post which best explains my current system: http://madameshepard.com/?p=1227. For informal formative assessments I use a very basic, generic rubric that I can just keep on hand and grab whenever I decide to assess a formative task (especially interpersonal tasks). Although I don’t remember including it in the blog, maybe I have. Is this where you saw the abbreviations PS, IC, etc? PS stands for Presentational Speaking and IC stands for Interpersonal Communication. Sorry I haven’t been very helpful!

          Reply
  23. Stephanie

    It is so gracious of you to spend time making & sharing this work. Like most French teachers (I think) I am teaching Level 1-AP with honors / academic differentiation in every class & this year we got new books for every level of French…it is SO difficult. This Petit Prince packet is going to literally save my life. Merci mille fois! And as I read above you have an invitation to Maine, you also have lunch in California! If you are ever here please non’t hesitate to respond. Merci encore.

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Stephanie! Thanks so much for your nice comment! In my new school I only have French 2 – 5/IB and I feel a lot more human with one less prep, although it is still a much heavier work load than most non-French teachers. I hope that something can be done about your inhumane schedule and I’ll look forward to our lunch in California! Lisa

      Reply
  24. Catherine

    I want to thank you for sharing your resources! I have used them a lot this year as I have bee converting to thematic units! You are a wealth of knowledge and experience! MERCI!!

    Reply

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