Joyeux Noël: Holiday-Themed Learning Stations for Intermediate Low French Students

 Just in case I’m not the only one scrambling for some engaging communicative activities for the end of the year, here are the holiday-themed stations that my French 3 students are doing this week.

Interpersonal Communication: Pair Crossword Puzzles Students take either Partner A or Partner B and give French clues to help their partner fill in the words that are missing from his/her paper.  The words are taken from this packet.

Interpretive Reading: Students read this Choose your own adventure” story and summarize what they read in English on this document.

Interpretive Listening: Students worked on the following Edpuzzles.

Chansons de Noel: Students completed the cloze activities on this handout and the completed this activity on lyricstraining.com (Click on “Play Game” and then “Maybe later.” )

Courage à tous!

Image Credit: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=233519&picture=joyeux-noel

5 thoughts on “Joyeux Noël: Holiday-Themed Learning Stations for Intermediate Low French Students

  1. Lana

    Merci mille fois, Madame! Too bad I won’t have time to use these this year, but will definitely do next year. In case you could use more interpersonal activities, here’s one I created based on an idea I had gotten at my very first PD seminar some 17 years ago. It’s more a vocabulary drill disguised as a game and might be more appropriate in the beginning of the unit, when introducing/reviewing the vocabulary on your list. The point of the game is to be strategic asking your partner questions to be the first to get his/her row of 4 on a 4 by 4 grid. Kind of like a bingo game with a twist. https://bellinghamschools-my.sharepoint.com/personal/svetlana_cuello_bellinghamschools_org/_layouts/15/guestaccess.aspx?docid=016b832af6e98477d912f2e7457546a52&authkey=AT-O5CqtC22aTS65dyWrGJo&e=2a33768171864f9e9f081755420fc7d2 There are versions A and B. Each has a 4×4 grid for questions they’ll ask their partner (and in which they’ll then record their partner’s answers) and a 4×4 grid with the answers they’ll give their partner. Each partner’s bingo grid has answers in 12 out of 16 squares and 4 squares in the grid are blank. When asked about a square with an answer, students answer in a complete sentence and their partner records that sentence in the question grid. When asked about a square without an answer, students say something like “Je ne sais pas”, “je n’ai aucune idée” (generic answer) or, if you want to challenge them, require something more custom – like in this case they can answer “Il/elle n’a rien fait”. The first partner to get 4 in a row wins and then they have to continue the exchange as a drill, until I stop them. This format can be used not just with verbs, I’ve used it with favorite colors (Quelle est la couleur favorite de…?), physical descriptions (Comment est…?), anything. It’s a little tricky to explain and the first time we play, some students are super confused and need extra modeling, but from then on there are no problems and they enjoy a little competition instead of the same old drill and many more stay on task, at least until someone wins 🙂 Hope my long explanation made sense. Bonnes vacances à tous!

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    1. Jennifer

      I was wondering if the partner A second section isn’t missing an action. Is there supposed to be one line that has all four filled out?

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  2. Lana

    It’s the third column (vertical line) that has all four answers, Jennifer. It’s hard to find when there are no pics. I meant to add illustrations too, but ran out of time.

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