L’Impressionnisme: Updated lessons for Intermediate Low Learners

As I mentioned in this previous post, one of my French 3 students’ favorite units each year is my unit on French Impressionism.  Although I’ve taught this topic for over 20 years, I modify my lessons each year based on my current understanding of best practices and access to technology.  Click here for an agenda to the first half of the unit, which is described below.

Lesson 1: Because this lesson was our first day back from our winter break, we spent about half of our 48-minute period discussing how we spent our vacation.  This left us just enough time for the short introductory presentation and guided notes.  While the input I provide during this presentation is more detailed than the simple statements in the guided notes, completing these notes helps focus the students’ attention and gives them some background knowledge and vocabulary for the next activity.

Lesson 2: During this lesson the students prepare a short presentation in which they explain which of two paintings is an example of Impressionism.  

Lesson 3: First the students will present their presentations to their classmates.  Because most of my students are very uncomfortable speaking to the class as a whole, they will present to only one other pair at a time.  To facilitate this, the students’ desks will be arranged in groups of 4, which each student sitting next to his/her partner.  Two students in each group will be facing the whiteboard, and the other two will be facing the bulletin board. During the first round, the whiteboard-facing pair will present to the students sitting across from them.  After 2 minutes, each whiteboard-facing pair will move to the next pair of bulletin-board facing students and will repeat their presentation. This will continue until the whiteboard facing pairs have presented to each bulletin board-facing pair.  Then, the bulletin-board facing pairs will perform their presentation for each of the whiteboard-facing pairs.  By performing presentations in this way, the students have a chance to improve their performance on each succeeding presentation, as well as to learn from their peers’ presentations.  By positioning myself next to one of the non-moving pairs during each rotation, I am able to assess all of the students by the end of the hour.  Note: I will have the students complete this peer feedback form for each presentation they hear. Following the presentations, I will present a 10 paintings on a Google Presentation and the students will mark I (Impressionniste) or P (Pas Impressionniste) on a sheet of loose-leaf as an assessment on this lesson.  Finally, in order to prepare for tomorrow’s lesson, the students will complete a few guided notes about Manet.  

Lessons 4-5: This lesson is a series of learning stations about Edouard Manet.  At the listening station, the students will complete three Edpuzzles, at the reading/writing station they will read an article and complete a comprehension guide and at the speaking station they will describe paintings to each other in order to complete a task.  In Activities 1 and 2, the students have the same 12 paintings, and they take turns describing them in order to determine the number/letter of the match on their partner’s paper.  In Activity 3, the students discuss each of 12 paintings in order to determine whether each one is the same or different than the corresponding painting on their partner’s paper.  In Activity 4, the students will describe their version of the painting in order to identify 5 differences (objects that I’ve whited out).  [Will be uploaded on 1/9] Because I will allow the students about 25 minutes at each station, these stations will continue on the second day.  The rest of the second day will consist of a short assessment on Schoology (biographical facts, choose the Manet paintings, etc.) and guided notes on our next artist, Degas.

Lessons 6-7: As with Manet, the students will spend 1.5 class periods on learning stations, with the rest of the second day being reserved for an assessment and guided notes for Monet. Because I use manipulatives that I prepared several years ago using postcards, stickers, etc., I am not able to share digital copies of the speaking materials.  However, I’m hoping that with the examples I created for Manet, interested teachers can quickly create their own such materials.  If anyone is willing to do so, I’d happily link them to this post and attribute them to you.

Lessons 8-9: Learning stations for Renoir.

In my next post, I’ll include my updated lessons for the post-impressionists.

 

20 thoughts on “L’Impressionnisme: Updated lessons for Intermediate Low Learners

  1. Muriel Damers

    Hello Mrs. Shepard, it looks like the link to the article about Monet is missing from your presentation.
    I created an activity for conversation similar to the one you created for Manet but how do I share the file with you? I will try to add it to our FB page. Thank you for all your hard work! My students are very engaged in my class thanks to you!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      I’ll add the Monet article, thanks for the heads up. I saw your document on FB so I’ll add it to the post. Thank you so much for doing this!

      Reply
      1. Muriel Damers

        I just checked the Monet article but I do not think that it matches the questions. You ask a lot about his house in Giverny, but little is mentioned in the article. Just wanted to let you know.
        Thank you for this fantastic unit by the way!

        Reply
        1. madameshepard Post author

          Oh, goodness. I’m so sorry. Those questions go to another article that I’ve used in the past. I just wrote questions to go with the Larousse article. Thanks so much for your kindness and patience!

          Reply
      2. Toni Tortorello-Allaway

        Which FB page? French Teachers in the US? I’ve searched there for these documents, but can’t seem to find them. BTW, this is an amazing unit! I cannot wait to try it out with my kids! Thank you so much for all this amazing work. I’ll gladly share anything I make to add to it!

        Reply
        1. madameshepard Post author

          Yes, Muriel generously shared her activity on the French Teachers in the US Facebook page. Thanks in advance for your willingness to share! Lisa

          Reply
  2. Muriel Damers

    How do you proceed after each painter’s day’s station is done? Do you collect the students’ reading/listening activities and grade them? Do you review the activities in class? I see my students 45 min every day. It takes them (at least) two days to finish the three stations for one painter. Is it normal?
    I have been grading the edpuzzles ( since it is so easy to do) but I am not sure if I should grade the reading station for each painter and if I should go over the students’ answers with them after they are done. How do you proceed?
    Thank you for sharing your lesson plans and all your knowledge with us! I really appreciate it!

    Reply
  3. Lisa

    Hi, Muriel. I do collect the students’ work. I record a grade for the Edpuzzles, and I sit with the speaking group so that I can provide feedback and a grade. I am grading some of the reading/writing, but won’t have time to grade all of them. I’ve been giving the students half a class (24 minutes) for each station, so they have 1.5 class periods for each artist. I use the remaining time on the 2nd day to give a short quiz as well as the notes for the next day’s artist. Many of the students don’t finish all of the reading station. I encourage them to go back to it if they have time remaining after the listening station. If they still don’t finish, I just grade it as is. (I use the rubric, but don’t take off for the questions that weren’t attempted.)

    Reply
  4. Ann

    I love your Impressionist unit. This is my first year teaching high school French (after having taught middle school for 10 years) and I have gotten so many great ideas from your blog. Thank you so much for sharing!

    Reply
  5. Ann

    I love your Impressionist unit. This is my first year teaching high school French (after having taught middle school for 10 years) and I have gotten so many great ideas from your blog. Thank you so much for sharing!

    Reply
  6. Susan Ridker

    Thank you so much for posting this unit! I love it! Quick question, though: have you posted the 10 painting presentation where the students will mark P or I on a piece of white lined paper? I couldn’t find it amongst your materials.
    Merci!

    Reply
  7. Myriam

    Thank you so much for this wonderful unit. Students are preparing for their presentation “Laquelle est impressionniste?” Although I did recognize some paintings I do not know all of them especially neo – classic paintings . Could you share name of painters and painting that you used for the slide show? Merci encore pour le partage!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Oh, gosh. I don’t know all of them either. My only goal was to present examples of non-Impressionist paintings, so I didn’t record the painters or titles of these. Sorry I can’t help! Lisa

      Reply
  8. karim kadmiri

    Bonjour Madame,
    Pouvons-nous utiliser vos présentations de Edpuzzle et si oui, comment peut-on y avoir accès en tant que prof pour pouvoir noter nos élèves?
    Merci bien
    Karim

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Je pense qu’il faut copier les activités dans votre contenu. C’est la première année que j’utilise Edpuzzle, donc je ne suis pas experte. Peut-etre il y a des lecteurs qui peuvent bien expliquer le processus?

      Reply
  9. Nathalie

    Hi Lisa! Did you end up doing lessons on Renoir, Matisse, Seurat and Toulouse-Lautrec? I have been looking for your updates…and want to make sure I did not miss anything!!! Love your unit!!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Nathalie. I did include Renoir with the Impressionists, but did not do the other 3. I usually find that the students are ready to move on to another topic after learning about the 7 artists that I’ve included in the unit.

      Reply

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