Resources for Planning and a Food Unit for Intermediate Low French Students

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As regular readers may have noticed, I ended up taking a hiatus from blogging this spring.  It all started when I welcomed an awesome student teacher to my classroom who was so well-skilled in proficiency-based instructional methods that I didn’t need to create any new lessons for several weeks. Then I decided to relocate closer to family, creating a whirlwind of life changes which including finding a new position, selling a house, buying a new house, moving and setting up a new household.  Needless to say, I had to put aside my blogging for a few months!  However, now that I’m settled into my new home I’m anxious to share some of the materials I’ve been working on for my new students.

Creating units for students that I’ve never met, in a school with a different curriculum and culture than the one I left has been a bit of a challenge.  Although I don’t know much about the proficiency level or personal interests of my new students, I can’t wait until August to begin preparing instructional materials for my new kiddos.

Besides, reading Chapter 1 of The Keys to Planning for Learning for #langbook has me thinking about all of the ways I can improve my planning and I’m excited to start implementing some of the ideas that are reinforced in this book.

I decided to start with my French 3 curriculum, since I will have three different French classes this year–half of my school day.  In addition to reading The Keys to Planning for Learning, I completed the self-assessment survey provided by the TELL Project before developing this unit.  As a result of this self-assessment, I realized I needed to be more intentional in developing daily objectives for my lessons. Although I had previously created Can Do Statements for each unit, I hadn’t provided my students with a clear objective for each lesson.  I have therefore included daily performance objectives in addition to the Essential Questions and Can Do Statements for this unit.  

Because the first theme in my new French 3 curriculum, “Nourriture,” is so broad, I have broken it down into three topics–breakfast, school lunch, and Francophone specialties. This Google Slide Presentation contains the unit plan as well as links to the materials I’ve created/borrowed for each of the 19 lessons in the unit.I am hoping that this format will improve transitions, encourage the students to work more independently and allow absent students to complete work from home. It will also facilitate sharing this work as I can continue to make edits/correct errors without having to reload word documents to this blog. While I’ve previously shared some of these materials, many others are new, including several Edpuzzle video quizzes that will serve as formative assessments in the 1:1 learning environment of my new school.  

While I have not included assessments in the presentation, you can click here for the breakfast IPA and here for the school lunch IPA. As the agenda shows, the students will prepare a presentation, rather than a full IPA as a summative assessment on the Francophone specialty topic.

 

As always, I welcome feedback on these materials!

 

Image Credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Italian_cooking_icon.svg?uselang=fr

 

36 thoughts on “Resources for Planning and a Food Unit for Intermediate Low French Students

    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Christine. I’ll probably spend a few days getting to know my new students before beginning this unit, but I don’t review, per se. The students will be using all of their previously learned skills to complete these activities. I have found that proficiency-based lessons constantly recycle structures so that review on isolated structures and vocabulary aren’t really necessary. I’d love to know your thoughts!

      Reply
  1. Nicole Jarvis

    Thank you so much for sharing this. I learn a LOT from reading reflections and about process and planning; I learn from your process. I find it fascinating to learn about IPA when it’s not something I have ever heard of in Canada (or at least in BC) and I’m so grateful to be able to learn from awesome teachers in AATF, ACTFL, Ohio, Ontario, New Brunswick, who have different ways of planning, assessing, reporting… Between this blog entry and some other sincere sources suggesting the Keys to Planning and the value of IPA, I’m going to dig deep to make the time to learn it. I’ve been procrastinating on ordering the Keys for $$$ reasons, waiting on PD funds, but I think I need to stop procrastinating and ‘just do it.’

    Thank you so much for sharing, and if you can gain anything from exploring my website or my association’s (relatively new & limited) website, I’d be very glad to give back in the spirit of your openness!

    Mmejarvis.weebly.com (< it's a bit jumbled sorry!)
    http://Www.bcatml.org (<volunteer based)
    http://Www.caslt.org

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Thank you so much for sharing and I’ll look forward to checking it out when I get to a computer. If it helps, I bought the Kindle version of Keys for $12.95. Keep in touch and let me know if you have any question a about IPA’s!

      Reply
  2. Christine

    I have always started with a review of what they have learned, just to make them feel comfortable. Last year I did not and last year I also was shooting for 90% tl was probably about 70%). Since I had a mixed bag of students, I later regretted that I did not do a review. I think they could have used it.
    So I thought I would start out with a review to remind them of what they know, especially since I am trying again for 90%. Maybe they would feel more comfortable speaking. In the past it has been more verb sheets, etc. But this year I want to use more apps on google chrome and get them speaking in the tl from day one.

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Christine. I think we all have to do what works for us in our classrooms. I don’t think there’s a right or wrong way! My personal experience has been that when I switched to designing lessons based on communicating ideas rather than memorizing specific vocab and structures, my students began speaking more fluently and confidently. I also found that I was more able to stay in the TL when I was discussing the content of texts rather than language rules. However, what works in my classroom might not work in someone else’s. I can tell you are a very dedicated teacher and I know you will find what works best for you! Keep in touch and let me know how it goes!

      Reply
  3. Madame A

    You are such a lifesaver! I am starting my first full time teaching job this year, levels 1-3 and you save me from starting from scratch (or following the textbook, blech). I’ve been following you since my student teaching. I don’t know what I would do without you! Thank you!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Thank YOU for your kind comments! I was a little hesitant to post on my blog after being away from it so long and kind comments like yours make it a lot easier to keep sharing!

      Reply
  4. Dahnya Chop

    Welcome back! I was so excited to see this in my inbox today! I will be presenting to my state organization this fall on thematic based units/ proficiency based instruction. After sitting on the sidelines for the last few years, I’m starting to feel comfortable with making this shift. I will be happy to share any of my units/lessons as well. Good luck with your new school year!

    Reply
  5. Stephanie

    Thank you so much for sharing this unit with us. It is wonderful!

    I am so glad you are sharing your blog again. You really help me understand performance based teaching.

    Best of luck at your new school. They are blessed to have you.

    Reply
  6. Christine

    Thank you! You have been such an inspiration to me. I used some of your ideas last year, as I start inching to a more communicative approach. (And not straight grammar) I love teaching, but it is so hard to know if you are getting it right.

    Reply
  7. Christine

    Hi again! I was wondering what your opinion was for having “verb posters” on the walls in the classroom. Do you think it is a good idea?

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      I think it’s a great idea! I have them and refer to them when I’m giving the kids feedback or answering questions about verb forms.

      Reply
  8. Christine

    Hi – I added this to your unit; A Day in the Life of… (there are a couple of mistakes and I use that as a mini-lesson)…she also plays a great song on her clarinette – and I ask the kids if she recognizes it. I hope you like this. Thanks again for all of your help.

    Regardez cette vidéo: Une journée typique https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpegnk-uH8o
    Separate verbs by Reflexive and Regular Verbs…do this on a separate sheet of paper.

    Reply
  9. Thuy

    Bonjour Lisa:
    Again, you are an amazing teacher. Thank you so much for all of the wonderful lessons that you have shared with us. One question, when I open your google slide , Date#1 activity#4 and 5 I could not open the links that indicate “feuille” and “edpuzzle”
    Merci
    Thuy

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Thank you! I tried fixing the links you referenced, but I’m not sure whether I was successful. The links work for me, but I see that they are not turning blue in the slideshow. Unfortunately, I don’t know enough about technology to pinpoint why they aren’t working. When I have a chance, I’ll try to educate myself, but with school starting tomorrow I’m afraid I don’t have time today–although if anyone has an idea I’d be happy to try it! Sorry–Lisa

      Reply
      1. Mme B

        For the EdPuzzle links that don’t work, it could be because the right links weren’t shared. The links to share can be found by going to “My Content,” clicking on the video, clicking on “Assign/Share,” and then clicking on “Share with Anyone.” There will be two options, a link to share with colleagues and another for Internet sites. For the blog, maybe try the “embed” option for websites and blogs?

        Reply
        1. madameshepard Post author

          Thank you so much for these suggestions! I was new to Edpuzzle when I created this unit, and clearly didn’t have the hang of it. When I get a chance, I’ll try to fix the links. In the meantime, I wonder if the activities can be located by doing a search for my name or the title at Edpuzzle?

          Reply
  10. Kris Ko

    Bonjour,
    You are an angel! I agree with your philosophy and plan on using your ideas this year. Thank you, thank you for this blog. I am a new teacher, the only French teacher in our school, and planning for levels 1-5. It’s hard to know where to begin. It’s rather overwhelming to say the least and your blog gives me hope. Merci!
    Have you ever thought of sharing your curriculum here or on teachers pay teachers? I’m dying to learn more about your plans and I would be more than willing to see your entire year mapped out.
    Thank you again.

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Kris. While I have shared many of my units here, I do not anticipate being able to share everything on TPT. For one thing, as a teacher who, like you, has 4-5 preps per year, I simply don’t have time to prepare materials for professional publication. Secondly, because I many of my activities are based on authentic resources, it is my understanding that I do not have the right to benefit financially from my materials. I’m sorry I can’t be of more help!

      Reply
  11. Fran

    Hi, Lisa! I have a question about pacing in regards to the French 3 Food Unit. Checking out the Google Slides, I see that you have “Date #1,” “Date #2,” etc… at the top of each slide. Are you able to work through all of the material on each slide in a single class period? If not, how many class periods would you predict this new lesson will take?

    Pacing has always been a struggle for me…thanks for your insight and experience (not to mention your amazing generosity with resources!)

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi! I used numbers rather than dates on the slides because I was preparing this unit before the school year began and I didn’t want to take the time to fill in all the date. I planned the lessons to correspond to my 48-minute class periods, knowing that I might need to revise as I actually implemented the unit. Even after 27 years, I do not always know how long an activity will take. I will add, though, that when it comes to communicative activities (especially interpersonal ones), I usually wrap up the activity and move onto the next one as soon as the first group is finished. It is almost never important that everyone finish one of these activities and I absolutely hate having down time. Keeping things moving in this way helps me to maintain my anticipated pace, although I continue to misjudge or be constrained by school scheduling conflicts beyond my control. Lisa

      Reply
      1. Kathy Zetts

        Thank you for the insight about moving on as soon as the first group finishes. I have been struggling with how to keep the “fast finishers” occupied while the others finish. Do the “slower finishers” often get frustrated at not being able to finish before they have to move on?

        Merci…..

        Reply
  12. Fran Burnett

    Hi, Lisa. I did try both searching by the title provided and by your name (and variations) without success.

    By the way, I used the Guess Who inspired game last week and my class loved it. The want a variation every Friday! I promised at least one per unit and got all smiles. Great idea you had there! Thanks so much!!

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Thanks for the feedback! Here are what I believe to be the correct links for the Edpuzzles I created for this unit.
      Apprendre le gout: https://edpuzzle.com/media/577e62f88911b97d27e0377d
      https://edpuzzle.com/media/577e561856408fee13573509 (petit dejeuner chez l’enfant)
      https://edpuzzle.com/media/577d697325fcf7eb47e038c9 (petit dejeuner essentiel)
      https://edpuzzle.com/media/57790c0f3cfdf58b29d87ebb (habitudes alimentaires chez les Belges)
      https://edpuzzle.com/media/5778e1a748539f3e3dc19f14 (l’age de classe)
      https://edpuzzle.com/media/5778db8b3cfdf58b29d86be2 (un gars et une fille)
      https://edpuzzle.com/media/577680913cfdf58b29d74942 (je prefere manger a la cantine)
      https://edpuzzle.com/media/57767a653cfdf58b29d74452 (nouveau decret)
      https://edpuzzle.com/media/5775b91748539f3e3dbff4ff (Que mangent les Francais au petit dejeuner)
      Please let me know if these work for you!
      (I’m so glad your students enjoyed the game!)

      Reply
      1. Kathy Zetts

        Thank you for the links, I find them a bit challenging myself! in the first one, I could have sworn it said that 6,000 children (not 6,000,000–the number given as the correct answer) ate in the cantine each day. And in the last one, I thought for sure that it said Philippe (the Dad) made black tea for himself, to which he added some milk. It looked like tea in the canister as well. I must be getting old!

        The idea of doing a questionnaire as the video goes by is pretty neat. Now if they’d only fix the issues that are blocking youtube from the teachers’ computers at my school…..it will be interesting to see if the Edpuzzles will play or not!

        Merci beaucoup!

        Reply
  13. Fran

    Merci mille fois! Yes, these new links work. They will work best if already logged into EdPuzzle before clicking on the links. Otherwise, the site will look similar to the student view and will give a “your work won’t be saved because you’re not logged in” message. When logged it before clicking on the link, the “Copy” button will be readily available.

    Reply
  14. Jill Susini

    Thank you for sharing your experiences and activities! I am the only language teacher at my high school and I find your blog incredibly helpful! I am starting my 4th year teaching French 1, 2, 3, + 4.

    Reply
  15. Ryan Boeding

    HI Madame Shepard!

    Like everyone on here I love to read your posts and ideas and thank you for them! I am in Ohio, I thought I saw something saying you work here as well?
    In regards to the Planning section on your blog. Is the ACTFL book you linked to your go to resource for the detailed and indepth planning that your lessons show?
    How do you find the time to create such detailed lessons? It is truly amazing.

    Merci

    Ryan

    Reply
    1. madameshepard Post author

      Hi, Ryan. Yes, I taught in Ohio for 27 years, but moved to Kansas City, MO this summer. I loved the ACTFL Keys to Planning for Learning book but only read it for the first time this summer, so older posts don’t reflect what I learned from that book. I have, however, used the book to guide my unit/lesson design this year and I highly recommend it! Time is definitely a struggle for all of us. I really enjoy planning lessons, so I don’t mind spending a lot of time on them. I wish I could say the same about grading papers! Lisa

      Reply

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